Ten Tips for a Successful Practice

The profession is going through an upheaval and shakeout of unprecedented impact. Some futurists predict that as many as a third of the lawyers in practice today will have left the profession within the next five years. How will small firm & solo attorneys need to change their thinking to stay viable? Some of my thoughts —

1. Learn from change, don’t resent it. Ask yourself “what is the opportunity here?”

2. The past ain’t coming back. Move forward or be left behind.

3. Embrace technology. It’s not a choice. Every old dog can learn new tricks. As Yogi  Berra once said, “first ya gotta wanna.”

4. Hire or keep a strong right arm. Without it you don’t have a practice. You have a job.

5. Attracting work is just as important as doing it. Get over it.

6. Develop a clear identity. General practice is not an identity. It’s a plea.

7. Three (okay, four) key words to remember that will help you stay alive: focus, niche and target market. You can’t survive trying to sell everything to everyone.

8. Be highly visible and active in your own and your target market’s community. You won’t be found by prospects if you are hiding in your office.

9. Your worst enemy is inertia, not your competition.

10. Think beyond this month’s billings. Without a roadmap to tomorrow you are living in yesterday.

Extraordinary Client Service – How It Translates to More, Better Business

Colleague and Legal Project Management Guru Pam Woldow of the Edge Group just posted a tale of client service as experienced at the Trump International Hotel. Her story, when considered seriously by attorneys and firms, can literally mean more, better business.

In working with my clients I emphasize the “Prospect to Client Continuum,” about how each touch, from first mention by a referral source to website impression, how the phone is answered, how they are greeted and treated when they come in, and especially how they are treated by the attorney – add up to a series of experiences that either increase or decrease their trust. And that translates to whether or not they hire you.

The truth is that most consumers, save the very sophisticated, don’t know how to evaluate whether or not you are a great lawyer. Instead, they will make decisions based on what others say about you (referrers) and how they “feel” about you. “Really liked them,” and “felt good about them” will be their reason for hiring. Conversely, “just wasn’t comfortable” or “we just didn’t seem to click” will be their reasons NOT to hire you (or sometimes even “too full of herself”). Those sentiments are the unconscious result of either great service, as alluded to in Pam’s post, or not-so-great service, as delivered in many offices.

Most lawyers think clients come in for the law, because of their “process” perspective. In truth, no client really wants an attorney or a “process.” They have a problem or opportunity, and the lawyer and the legal process are actually the obstacles they have to get through to get what they really want – a solution or a win. It is up to the attorney to deliver an overall positive “experience” and not just a “process.”

Then, great service continued throughout the representation adds up to bills that are paid faster, greater client cooperation (due to greater trust), and more client referrals. Yes, even if the outcome of your representation wasn’t the hoped-for one, so long as you have built their trust through great client care.

Every day, the profession is seeing more competition from every direction. It’s time we as a profession focus on service, not just process, because it’s the way the world outside the law works, and what consumers expect – and deserve.

Have You Watered Your Referral Sources Lately?

The rainy season is upon us here in Central Florida after a very dry winter. Suddenly everything in our yard that was dry and struggling is lush and green and blossoming.

Just like my landscape, healthy relationships require nurturing. If you’re intent on maintaining productive and blossoming relationships with those who help you feed your family, you have to honor my fourth and last rule for effective referral marketing: stay in contact consistently over time.

It’s not about “sales.” It’s about genuine relationship. Think about that personal friend who never seems to reach out to you, even though you regularly initiate contact. after a while you’re likely to give up, cross them off your list.

It’s the same with referral sources. Say “thank you” with a phone call, personal note or e-mail when that referrer sends you a prospect (even if they don’t hire you). Periodically reach out just to reconnect and find out what’s been happening in their lives, as a friend would. Keep the relationship warm.

After all, relationship marketing is, in the end, about building and maintaining an extensive group of friends who you enjoy connecting with, and who are happy to help you be successful. If you don’t, they are likely to forget you and refer to someone else, or even worse, proactively cross you off their referral list because they feel unappreciated or forgotten.

FYI, here are my four simple rules for relationship marketing, each of which, of course, has considerable detail behind it. But the basic concepts are simple:

1. Talk to the right people.
2. Build honest relationships
3. Make sure they know what you do and who you work with.
4. Stay in touch consistently over time.

It ain’t rocket science. But it does require focus, consistency and, most importantly, background systems and structure to achieve maximum efficiency and leverage.