The Rising Schizophrenia In Our Profession

Much has been written recently about the increasing gap between the haves and the have-nots in this country. There’s clear evidence that, while the rich are getting richer, the middle-class is increasingly being squeezed, and a large percentage of them are heading for lower middle or even lower class financial status.

It’s the same in our profession. Some attorneys and firms are enjoying boom times, while an increasing percentage are struggling financially. (Read Susan Carter Liebel’s recent post 80% of Americans Can’t Afford Your Legal Fees”). For some the issue is how to cope with overwhelm – that is, how to increase capacity and efficiency, and take maximum advantage of boom times. For others, the issue is, literally, professional survival: how to attract sufficient business to stay afloat.

The solutions for both situations are radically different. But the root issue is the same: attorneys must break out of more traditional thinking and take dramatic and, yes, often risky, steps to change direction.

The “haves” of the profession must literally rethink who and what they are. Most are still stuck in the traditional “technician” role, simply working ever harder as more work comes in. The road out for them is reinventing their role – from “doing it, doing it” to creating, leading, and managing teams. Without this change they are actually limiting their ability to grow even more because they are working at – and usually even beyond – their capacity. These fortunate attorneys have even more work available to them – if they only had time to market and the capacity to handle more work. Where I have helped attorneys evolve from do-er to team leader, dramatic revenue increases have followed.

For much of the rest of the profession – the comfortable middle class and those who are struggling – the issue is more visceral: how to survive and thrive in a dramatically more competitive environment, and one in which the price and value of basic legal services is collapsing.

For them rethinking is about marketing. They must move from “marketing by wandering around” and living in hope to tight and aggressive focus on target markets, and evolving their services from general to more niched and specialized. In effect, they must identify and own specific “small towns” – that is, special interest communities – where they can become highly visible and preeminent. And this tight focus must also incorporate Web, social media and even advertising. But the result is dramatic: stabilized and increased income, and a strong, long-term position as the “go to” attorney in their specific “small towns.”

For both groups, there is a road up and out of their present positions. And for both, it starts with a new answer to the question “who am I as a professional?”

Call me if I can help.